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Our Research Conference

Applied Coaching Research Conference 2019 – Shaping the Future of Coaching 

 

When? Tuesday 19 February 
Where? Derby County Football Club 

Following the success of our sell-out inaugural research conference, we are pleased to be continuing our theme – Shaping the Future of Coaching – at our second event.

What's more tickets are on sale now!

What can I expect?

On the day we’ll be joined by fantastic keynote speaker Tony Strudwick and another fantastic guest soon to be announced.  

We’ll have poster presentations in our Research Lounge and a variety of workshops available to choose from. Sessions will focus on one of three sub-themes:

  • Innovative coaching practice
  • Coach experience and well-being
  • Contemporary learning solutions 

There will be time to network before and after the event, and a choice of 'time for you' sessions will be offered in the afternoon to extend the well-being theme to all delegates. 

Early bird tickets are available now - and won’t be around for long

A limited number of early bird tickets will be available until Sunday 7 January (or until they're sold out, whichever comes first). Early bird price is just £100 (including VAT). 

Please take a look at the workshops available - full descriptions of each workshop in each session can be found below. It is advisable to have these open alongside the booking page or to make your selections before you book as you’ll need to select your four workshops when you book your ticket.  

Research Conference 2019

The early bird catches the worm...

Click the button below to book your early bird ticket to our research conference 

BOOK MY TICKET

Session 1: 11:15

Session deliverers 

Prof. Chris Cushion, Loughborough University and Sean Rooney, Leicester City Football Club

Who is the session for?

Coaches, coach developers and designers of coach development/coach education.

Session information

The aim of this research was to examine the use of coach observation data and video to understand and develop coaches’ practice 'in-situ'. Using quantitative data from the Coach Analysis Intervention System (CAIS) combined with video and qualitative data from coach interviews and ‘coaching groups’ the research presents findings from a series of coach development interventions with a professional youth football academy - where a structured coach development programme was devised.

This session will show the link between research, practice and developing positive coaching outcomes. It showcases an 'evidence-based' coach development programme within a 'live' coaching environment.

Session outcomes: 

  • Delegates will develop an understanding of the collection and use of objective data to inform a coach development intervention. 
  • How a coaching intervention can be structured to encourage changes in practice and creating 'coaching cells' to enable coach-to coach development. 
  • Presentation of evidence showing increased coach awareness and changes in practice.

Session deliverers

James Mitchell, University of Derby

Who is the session for?

Coach educators, coaches and academics. 

Session information

Coaches use observation as a fundamental tool to inform much of their coaching practice. The vision and qualities of a coach’s observation (analysis, diagnosis and feedback) may inform every aspect of their training and competition. Through a directed visual search of the environment, and the ability to extract useful information from the visual display, a coach can identify key aspects of the athlete’s performance that can subsequently be targeted for improvement. Despite the importance of effective observation, there is currently scarce empirical research to inform the education of coaches. A systematic understanding of the mechanisms that underpin the development of effective observational analysis has yet to be explored.

Session outcomes: 

  • To understand the mechanisms underpinning effective observational analysis and how eye tracking technology works. 
  • Provide a practical demonstration of how eye tracking technology works, emphasising its application in coach education and athlete development. 
  • Delegates will gain insight into how eye tracking methodology can be applied in the real world for all levels of coaching practice. 

Session deliverers 

UK Coaching

Who is the session for?

Coach developers, system managers, coaches and academics.

Session information

Learning takes place everywhere and as a result, informal and social learning is receiving greater recognition within the coaching sector. One example of informal learning that has emerged is communities of practice. The concept of a community of practice was developed by Lave and Wenger (1991) and represents a group of people who interact with each other in pursuit of a common purpose and/or passion. Within the coaching sector, a community of practice can provide coaches with the opportunity to learn and share ideas with each other, problem solve and generally support each other.

The purpose of this session is to share findings from the initial stages of a longitudinal project, which developed a real life community of practice for a group of coaches working in a foundation trust. The project used an innovative evaluation approach to measure the impact of the community of practice on the coaches involved.

Session outcomes:

  • To demonstrate how research concepts can be applied to a real-life community of practice for sport coaches.
  • To present an innovative evaluation approach used to measure the impact of a community of practice and share stories of how the community of practice has impacted on the coaches involved.
  • To share the findings so far regarding the effectiveness of methods/approaches used in the planning and delivery of a community of practice.
  • Delegates to take away recommendations of how to set up and implement a community of practice.

Session deliverers 

Dr Leanne Norman, Leeds Beckett University

Who is the session for?

Coach developers, policy makers and system managers, and academics.

Session information 

The purpose of this session will be to present the findings of a programme of research led at the School of Sport, Leeds Beckett University around the topic of improving gender equity in sport coaching. Findings from a number of studies within this programme will be summarised as to the experiences, representation, and status of different groups of women as coaches (in this case), and how these experiences relate to the contexts in which coaches work. The purpose of the programme is to contribute intelligence towards making coaching as a profession, fairer and equitable for all.

The intention of the session will be to build on our understanding of coaching as often a gender imbalanced profession, to devise practical ideas and recommendations towards addressing this lack of inclusion

Session outcomes:

  • Understand how different coaches experience their role and how experiences are shaped by the organisational structures in which they occur.
  • Receive practical recommendations and strategies towards addressing any imbalances or inequities within their own coaching workforces.
  • Learn about and discuss the pertinent areas of organisational culture and performance that contribute to (a lack of) diversity amongst their coaching workforces, and what can be done to address these.

Session deliverers 

Dave Hembrough and Siobhan Houldridge, Sheffield Hallam University

Who is the session for?

Coaches and club leaders.

Session information

The purpose of this research was to explore the experiences of women participating in the Powerbelle Programme; a 10 week women only community strength training programme. Specifically we were interested in determining the effect of the Powerbelle programme on participants' self efficacy.

Powerbelle is delivered by Hallam Barbell Strength and Fitness Club as part of their 'life course' model. It is a community initiative that focuses on providing a specific service and experience to a particular audience in line with the Sport England 'Towards An Active Nations' Strategy. Powerbelle is delivered by female practitioners with a practitioner development model that offers development opportunities to young coaches who want to learn and improve. Powerbelle is novel and innovative in its coaching practice and the approach it takes in offering women a safe and nurturing environment to train, socialise and to become fit, strong and healthy.

Session outcomes:

  • Understand self-efficacy in relation to female experiences in sport.
  • Explore alternative recruitment, delivery and retention models.
  • Delegates will be inspired by a novel and growing programme.
  • Delegates to be challenged within their paradigm as to how things could be done differently.

Session 2: 12:05

Session deliverers 

UK Coaching

Who is the session for?

Coach developers, system managers and anyone working with coaches or interested in promoting positive well-being.

Session information

The benefits of coaching are well known for participants, but the benefits of being a coach to the individual themselves are less promoted. Our Coaching in the UK study (UK Coaching, 2017) demonstrated a positive association between being a coach and mental health ratings. Similarly, research into volunteers has found that volunteering in sport is significantly associated with greater well-being; sport volunteers experience a greater sense of happiness and worthwhile contribution than general volunteering (Fujiwara, Lawton & Watt, 2018). Given that 75% of active coaches work in some voluntary capacity (UK Coaching, 2017), it is important to consider the positive impact that coaching can have on well-being and use this as a way to encourage more people to become involved or stay involved in coaching.

Through the session, we will draw upon case studies of individuals who have experienced a positive impact and discuss how we can use coaching as a vehicle for achieving positive well-being.

Session outcomes:

  • Explore the benefits of coaching.
  • Share stories of where coaching has had a positive impact on coach well-being.
  • Discuss the idea of ‘prescribing’ coaching as a way to improve well-being.

Session deliverers 

Liam McCarthy and Tom Hounsell, St Mary’s University

Who is the session for?

Policy makers, system builders and coach developers. Anyone with responsibility for designing, developing and delivering coach education and development programmes.

Session information

Research in the field of coach education has grown steadily over the last 30 years. Yet, too often, this research draws pessimistic conclusions about the impact of coach education on coaching practice, and the subsequent role coach education plays in the long-term development of coaches (Abraham and Collins, 1998; Mallett et al., 2009; Nelson, Cushion and Potrac, 2013). 

Attending to criticisms that coach education can be inauthentic, simulated and instruction-based, many examples are beginning to emerge of more authentic, contextualised and coach-centred programmes and practices (in both national governing bodies of sport and higher education). As part of this, technology appears to be a key driver of innovation and change. In the Coaching Plan for England (Sport England, 2016), technology is identified as one of three key enablers in enhancing coaching practice and thus, the participant experience. 

Session outcomes:

  • To share experiences of planning and delivering technology-enhanced coach development experiences for coaches, across a range of contexts.
  • To share some of the trade-offs and returns, which presented tensions along the way, as well as the range of outcomes that were achieved.
  • Present a more nuanced picture of the role of technology in coach development and use examples to explain why it might not be the panacea we imagine. 

Session deliverers 

Julie Blackwood, Julie Blackwood Sport Pyschology and Loughborough University, and Merlin Van De Braam, Lawn Tennis Association

Who is the session for?

This session may be of particular interest to other national governing bodies of sport, academics and all coaches from grass roots to high-performance. 

Session information

The LTA Coach Development team support the British Tennis coaching workforce to ensure that players receive great on court experiences when they attend a session with an LTA Qualified/Accredited Coach. The purpose of the project was to develop a set of common principles of effective coaching in British Tennis, applicable across tennis coaching domains and that consider a wide range of tennis coaching contexts, to inform future coach development.

The session will show how a guide capturing the essence of the coaching process can be aligned to meet player goals/needs, taking into account the personal characteristics of the coach and desired psychosocial outcomes.

Session outcomes:

  • Delegates will be introduced to the research process and the six principles generated, specifically the way that the principles have been positioned as guiding constructs for context-specific interpretation and application.
  • Gain insight into how the research has been integrated into the LTA coaching qualifications framework.
  • Delegates will be provided with contemporary ideas about what it means to be effective and how coaches can optimise player learning through considered practice design.
  • Delegates will consider how the research relates to their own practice (through reflection).

Session deliverers 

Dr Alex Twitchen, Open University and Michael Antrobus and Ciara Allan, Football Association

Who is the session for?

Coach developers/educators, tutors, system builders and coaching development officers.

Session information

Learning to become a better coach is an untidy process that is never straightforward or easy. The UEFA B ‘Vets’ project has been designed to provide an innovative solution to the challenge of scaffolding and supporting the ongoing development of coaches. 16 coaches who participated in a UEFA B qualification during 2017-2018 volunteered to act as mentors to the cohort of coaches undertaking the UEFA B qualification in 2018-2019. The purpose of this approach was to provide an additional and complementary form of mutually beneficial support that featured a different power dynamic to the typical tutor-coach relationship. Our research was designed to capture the impact this project had on the development of both those coaches on the current UEFA B qualification and those 'Vets' who had completed the qualification last season.

Session outcomes:

  • Delegates to understand how a mutually beneficial support network can be created where learning is shared between coaches working towards and having achieved a coaching qualification.
  • The session will provide a practical illustration of a project that perceives a coaching qualification not as a singular event in the development of coaches but as part of their ongoing learning.
  • Demonstrate how a coaching qualification has been used as the focus to build a wider network.

Session deliverers

 Dr Colum Cronin, Liverpool John Moores University

Who is the session for?

Practising coaches, coach educators and policy makers.

Session information

Coaches have a well-established duty of care towards their participants. This duty of care is grounded in legislation that laudably aims to protect participants (eg children). Understandably, much coaching policy adopts this approach to care, and focuses on the minimum standard of preventing abuse. The purpose of this research, however, is to report on four case study coaches who engage in caring relationships that do much more than prevent harm. These caring relationships are authentically consensual, involve athlete voice and benefit athletes. Thus, this research helps us to consider how coaches can enact a more ambitious duty of care.

This presentation will introduce concepts that are fundamental to caring relationships such as 1) engrossment; 2) motivational displacement; and 3) reciprocity. Examples of how coaches in athletics and basketball implement these concepts will be provided in order to connect theory with practice.

Session outcomes:

  • Gain an understanding of care theory concepts and how these can be applied to delegates’ own coaching practice.
  • Delegates will learn about the experiences of coaches who are engaging in caring relationships.
  • Delegates will develop a more ambitious notion of duty of care and have the opportunity to discuss applied examples of how practicing coaches have cared for athletes.

Session 3: 14:40

Session information

Fancy stretching your legs and taking a tour around Derby County's stadium? 

This session will provide delegates with a 20 minute stadium tour along with the opportunity to view posters and have informal conversations with other delegates.

Session deliverers 

Steve Peters, British Gymnastics Foundation

Session information

Love to Move is the British Gymnastics Foundation’s evidence based age and dementia friendly, cognitive enhancement gymnastics programme. Chair-based, the Programme uses music along with a mixture of carefully designed low intensity exercises to get people moving and having fun, increasing their heart rates and breathing to improve fitness and well-being in complete safety. In this session, delegates will have the opportunity to experience the Programme for themselves.

Session deliverers

Table Tennis England and UK Coaching

Session information

Low-intensity aerobic exercise has been linked to increasing positive moods. Table tennis is flexible, adaptable and can be played how you want! It is also sociable and great for lifting spirits. Why not come and have a go, and chat to your fellow delegates at the same time.

Session deliverers

Fiona Adamson, Yoga Sports Specialist

Session information

Yoga is great for promoting good physical and mental health. However, traditional yoga isn’t always accessible. With chair yoga, traditional yoga poses are modified so that they can be done whilst seated, making yoga accessible to all. Sign up to this session if you fancy trying something new to harmonise the body and the mind.

Session deliverers

Dave Hembrough, Sheffield Hallam University

Session information

Mindfulness is a technique which can help you to pay more attention to the present moment. It aims to help people to become more self-aware, feel less stressed and be more in control of how they respond to thoughts and feelings. Dave runs a MindfullySTRONG programme, which integrates mindfulness and physical training in a unique way. As part of this session, Dave will lead delegates through a MindfullySTRONG meditation.

Session information

If you want to take some time out of the conference, this session is for you! Use this time to catch up on emails, reflect on your learning or connect with other delegates.

Session 4: 16:00

Session deliverers

Lauren Downham and Prof. Chris Cushion, Loughborough University 

Who is the session for?

Coaches, coach developers and coach education/development programme designers.

Session information

The purpose of this research was to consider critically how high-performance sport coaches understand reflection and how this understanding impacted ‘reflective practice’. Data were collected from a National High-Performance coach education programme. Thirty semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 high-performance sport coaches, and programme staff. Participant observation was undertaken of coach education workshops (n = 6) each running for two-three days.

Through the research, a reflection framework was developed. The framework aims to provide clarity with regards to reflections in the form of a resource for coaches and coach developers to support them in accessing multiple levels of reflection to reap the full benefits of reflective practice in challenging and developing coaching in unique ways.

This session will demonstrate the link between research and coach education. It will also showcase an ‘evidence-based’ reflection framework and how this is being shared in a ‘live’ coach education programme.

Session outcomes:

  • Delegates to take away an improved understanding of reflection and reflective practice.
  • Delegates will be able to apply ‘evidence-based’ practical prompts, designed to support reflection, to their coaching practice.
  • Delegates will understand how high-performance coaches’ have applied reflective practice.
  • Delegates will be presented with a reflection framework which includes practical support to enable reflective practice development.

Session deliverers

Luke Norris, Leeds Beckett University and Bradford City FC

Who is the session for?

Coaches and practitioners working with coaches.

Session information

Sports coaching can be an inherently stressful occupation because coaches must fulfil multiple roles and cope with various expectations. Stress and well-being have implications for coach and athlete performance yet there is no systematic review that has comprehensively identified, evaluated, and summarised the coaches’ experiences of stress and well-being among coaches. The objective of this study was to conduct a comprehensive systematic review of literature on stressors, coping, and well-being among sports coaches.

The purpose of the session is to provide coaches and practitioners working with coaches, an overview of the current research that explores coaches’ stressors, coping, and well-being experiences. More specifically, this will provide the audience with the stressors that coaches’ encounter (e.g., pressure from the organisation) and the different strategies that coaches’ use to cope with these stressors (e.g., social support). Finally, it will discuss how coping with these stressors can affect their well-being.

Session outcomes:

  • Understand the stressors coaches experience, strategies to cope with these stressors and the effects of stressors and coping on coaches’ well-being.
  • Provide delegates with an opportunity to discuss stressors that coaches experience as well as practical coping strategies to assist coaches to cope.

Session deliverers 

Doug MacDonald, Scottish Canoe Association and Richard Cheetham MBE, University of Winchester

Who is the session for?

Coaches, coach developers and academics with an interest in the progression of pathway, and performance athletes and coaches.

Session information

The concept of deliberate play was born out of a real-world need identified in the pathway and performance coach development programme. The coach developer identified a potential over-reliance on linear pedagogy in the coaching processes of coaches. As a result, the use of deliberate play in accelerating learning of both athletes and coaches was explored. Often, play research is associated with team sports rather than individual sports. Therefore, this session provides the opportunity to share our learning with a wider audience.

Through the project, the aims were to:

  1. Support coaches with the application of deliberate play in their coaching environments
  2. Explore how effective deliberate play could be in accelerating the progression of paddlers in the performance programme
  3. Support a new talent transfer para-athlete in her transition to the sport
  4. Inform the ongoing planning processes for slalom paddlers in the performance programme

Session outcomes:

  • Learn how deliberate play can be integrated alongside more linear pedagogies in order to positively impact the coaching practice of pathway and performance coaches.
  • Give delegates the opportunity to experience some of the tools and concepts used in the research and consider how they can use these in their own contexts in order to support their own athletes and coaches.
  • Expose delegates to sports they are unlikely to be familiar with and the fresh perspectives that these can offer.

Session deliverers 

Dr Luciana De Martin Silva, Hartpury University and John Francis, University of Worcester

Who is the session for?

Coaches, managers and lecturers. Anyone interested in learning.

Session information

Working in disability sport presents its own unique sets of challenges, especially regarding how to best support learning, which has been highlighted as key for enhancing performance and well-being (e.g., Stevens and Huddy, 2016). The aim of this longitudinal study was to explore the learning experiences of deaf international futsal players when using an online platform to support face to face learning in preparation for a major competition.

This study adopted a longitudinal design (8 month duration). Data was collected from 10 players and 3 staff members who were part of an International Deaf Women’s Futsal team. As an attempt to provide players with ‘contemporary learning solutions’ to best cater for their needs, this project focused on using an online learning platform to complement face to face learning.

Session outcomes:

  • Delegates will gain insight into the learning experiences of deaf players using online learning alongside face to face learning. 
  • Delegates will understand how online platforms can complement face to face learning, in particular amongst deaf participants.  
  • Delegates will reflect on and explore how contemporary learning solutions can be applied to your own coaching context.

Session deliverers

Dr Charlotte Woodcock, University of Birmingham 

Who is the session for?

Coaches and leaders of sport and physical activity.

Session information

This session will present an impact case study looking at the learning journeys of community sport providers who attended an innovative coach development programme, Empowering Coaching for Doorstep Sport (EC4DS). The programme – resulting from a collaboration between StreetGames and the University of Birmingham – aims to increase coach understanding and expertise in developing motivationally empowering climates in sport. A key objective of this research is to understand how motivationally empowering strategies have been adopted and integrated into coaching practice, as well as exploring the behavioural, psychological, and emotional impact of EC4DS training has had on sport leaders and their young participants.

This session will share the impact of an innovative evidence-based coach development programme on sport leaders working in deprived areas aiming to engage young people in sport and physical activity.

Session outcomes:

  • Introduce the empowering coaching principles and how they can be embedded into coaching practice.
  • Delegates will learn the theoretical principles underpinning motivationally empowering climates and how these psychological environments impact sport participants thoughts, emotions, and behaviours.
  • Through sharing sport leaders’ learning journeys, delegates will gain insight into how motivationally empowering climates are created and sustained in community sport.

Posters

Throughout the conference there will be posters displayed in the break-out areas. Delegates will have an opportunity to view the posters and ask presenters/creators questions about what is displayed during the breaks between sessions. 

Presenter

Title

Joanne Lifford, University of Derby

A Scoping Review of the Current Literature in Knowledge Transfer in Sports Coaching in the UK

David Eldridge, University of Chichester

The Exploration of Practice on Youth Soccer Player’s Visual Exploratory Activity

Ashley Gill, Staffordshire University

Factors Affecting University Sports Students Engagement with NGB Coaching Qualifications

Tim Bamber, Professional Golfers’ Association

Examining the Pedagogy behind the use of E-learning in Coach Development: A Case Study of a Sports Organisation

Manuel Santos, Cardiff Metropolitan University

What Can Coaches Learn from Jazz and Improv Theatre?

 

Research Conference 2019

The early bird catches the worm...

Click the button below to book your early bird ticket to our research conference 

BOOK MY TICKET